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On this property of our partner Coincidir in Guatemala a shelter is being built for children who have experienced violence. The children should say what they want for this house: They wrote and painted, for example, a reading room, a library, a computer room, a sports field, a garden, fountains and fireplaces. (Source: Fabian Strauch)
On this property of our partner Coincidir in Guatemala a shelter is being built for children who have experienced violence. The children should say what they want for this house: They wrote and painted, for example, a reading room, a library, a computer room, a sports field, a garden, fountains and fireplaces.


30 years UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: Children need to be more involved

(Duisburg, 18.11.2019) The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child, which was adopted 30 years ago, has improved the chances of many millions of children worldwide in recent years. "Nevertheless, we must not let up and continue to work together with children and young people to defend their rights," says Katrin Weidemann, CEO of Kindernothilfe. Currently, violence and conflicts threaten the lives of every fourth child (250 million), and around 300 million young people are exposed to poverty and violence due to the rapid urbanization in slums. As a study by Kindernothilfe now shows, representatives of local non-governmental organizations and child rights activists around the world see increasing inequality and violence, population development and climate change as the greatest threats to future generations.

The central finding of the Kindernothilfe survey in 32 countries is that children and young people should be more involved in political decisions in order to change their living conditions sustainably. The strengthening of children as "agents of change" who are committed to improving their own living conditions is therefore already part of Kindernothilfe's project work.

In the future, Kindernothilfe, together with its partners and thematic alliances, will face the concrete challenges of increasing violence and the limited capacity of civil society to act through systematic worldwide advocacy work. "Together with our partners, Kindernothilfe Switzerland, Austria and Luxembourg and the worldwide advocacy networks and alliances, we can strengthen our project partners in their concrete work and give children a voice", Katrin Weidemann continues. "Children's rights concern us all!

As one of the largest Christian child rights organizations in Europe, Kindernothilfe has been supporting disadvantaged girls and boys on their way to an independent and self-determined life for 60 years. It supports around 600 projects and provides humanitarian assistance. Kindernothilfe currently protects, strengthens and supports more than 2 million children and their families and communities in a total of 32 countries around the world in order to improve their living conditions sustainably.